DECOLONISATION VS SELF-DETERMINATION

Just trying out these sentences, seeing how it feels saying them out loud…. 1) If only we built up our own spaces, with the same energy that we try to decolonise other people’s. 2) If only we built up places that already belong to us, rather than attempting to decolonise spaces that don’t. 3) With

Say It With Your Work

I found this great adaptation image on the exittheapple website, and I loved it so much I’m posting it here. This image sums up my motivation for getting into creative endeavours of film, photography and writing etc in the first place, (see my work at website – click here), and it’s a great reminder. As

Chapter in new book ‘Slavery and the British Country House’

Proud to see this book arrive, ‘Slavery and the British Country House’, published by English Heritage, which includes a chapter by me and Rob Mitchell. Book edited by Madge Dresser. The book is full of insights into how the finances from the slave trade built the aristocracy and the legacies still visible in the British landscape. Link

40th anniversary of Hip Hop culture

40th anniversary of Hip Hop culture today, which gave birth to MCing, break dancing (and related dance styles) and graffiti art. It’s been quite a journey so far, containing the good, the bad and the ugly. Hip Hop gave me my first independent moment(s) of constructive focus as a teenager, inspiring me to be creative.

Bristol police miss opportunity to work with community filmmakers to build dialogue after riots

See below the latest street news video by the South Blessed Community Channel, as a follow-up to their anti-Tesco film, (see previous post).  Last night the local police used vans and deployed a helicopter to stop the screening of a film in a park about last week’s riots.  When the screening moved to a local house, at first the police then

Missing persons reportage in the traditional press and social media outlets

The following is a reply I sent to Rachel MacPherson, a journalism student from University of the West of Scotland.  She was writing her dissertation on the media’s representation of victims of crime, in particular missing person cases, and read my post about Serena Beakhurst and wanted my opinion.  I provided answers to her questions, as shown

Photography, protest and politics (deliberate small’p’s)

Over the next year I’m going to go back to my roots and make more pictures, both still and moving, as well as writing words (which I may do less).  As a political (small ‘p’) animal at heart, it is work that has something to say, or maybe more importantly work that asks questions, that

Fresh Flix young people’s film festival, Watershed, Bristol

This review was originally written for an AHRC/Radio 3 proposal.  (I’ve added a few extra words to the 300 word limit I was given.) ———- Last week I attended a showcase of films made by 12 young people from Bristol, all taking part in a UK Film Council scheme which aims to support Black and minority ethnic talent

3rd Cinema Screening Room #2: Average Journey For An Average Refugee

Continuing the theme of Third Cinema films coming out of community media, please see the film below.  It is based on a true story, and by a pure coincidence relates to the discussion of ‘Six Degrees of Separation’ that I explored in the previous post, though the film has a very different conclusion. Average Journey For

3rd Cinema Screening Room #1: Women’s Voices

This film was made with female prisoners in the UK.  Originally commissioned for a conference on the issue of women in prison, the work was deemed too powerful for the prison service and they tried to stop it being shown.  Their decision was not honoured and it was shown anyway and caused much debate.  The women